Technical Info

Plastic Properties

Plastruct Model Parts and Accessories are manufactured in several plastic materials. The choice of material was based upon the final use of the Product as well as workability and price.

Below you will find useful information and characteristics of the most commonly used plastic materials to assist you in using them properly.

The most commonly used plastic materials are:
  1. ABS – known for its strength, durability and workability.
  2. Butyrate – pliable, machinable and durable.
  3. Styrene – compatible, strong and workable.
  4. Acrylic – rigid, strong and generally brittle.
  5. Copolyester – pliable, stress resistant and durable.

Plastic has been used whenever possible because it is easier and faster to work with than wood, metal or cardboard. Plastic can be sawed, blade cut, drilled, lathe-turned, carved, sanded and filled. Most standard woodworking tools may be used on plastic and it will not splinter. Plastic parts join in seconds with small amounts of liquid solvent cement. For bonding plastic sheet materials to foam, wood or Masonite, Contact Cement can be used. For large sheet stock, many professionals prefer to use counter sunk screws for attachment. A spray adhesive is sometimes easier for small jobs.

ABS

ABS has been hailed by professional modelmakers as “the best all-around construction material since wood”. Stronger and more rigid than many metals; easier and more flexible to work with than any previous plastic; cleaner and more durable than wood, ABS structural shapes by PLASTRUCT have been used for engineering design models on an international scale since their introduction. ABS is also one of the best plastics for heat or vacuum forming and, of course, has excellent bonding characteristics, not only to itself but to other commonly used plastics.

Plastruct Traditional Structural Shapes are all carefully molded and extruded to extremely close tolerance and in the colors to best represent the materials being simulated. The plastic we have selected (an ABS formulation) best meets our specifications for stability with just the desired amount of flexibility to minimize shock.

ABS is a thermoplastic terpolymer combining the best qualities of the Acrylics, Butyrates, and Styrenes. It is more than half again as rigid as its cousin, Styrene, and size for size, is nearly as rigid as brass. Extremely resistant to most acids and alkalies, the ABS lustrous surface is unaffected by most chemicals, even lacquer – a property unheard of in the early plastics.

Unlike wood and brass, Plastruct ABS Traditional Structural Shapes require no priming, sanding, or sealing to enhance its hard finish. But like even the most primitive plastics, ABS bonds easily, quickly, and with a minimum of fuss.

BUTYRATE

The material used in our Traditional Round Tubing medium is Butyrate plastic. It has proven to be ideal because it is so convenient to work with. It can be cut, turned, drilled, painted and easily cemented. The Tubing and Tubing Fittings are manufactured to provide a good friction fit and maintain the outside diameter; splines on the male Fittings accomplish tight fit and prevent undesired rotation and still allow intentional turning. This feature permits cementing to be a final operation. The telescoping sizes of the pipe combined with the workability makes improvisation quite simple.

Butyrate can be lathe-turned in the same manner as brass or Cast Acrylic. Grind the cutting tool to provide chip clearance. The resultant turnings will have a polished surface. This material can also be drilled, tapped, carved or saw cut. Very slow speed is required for machine sanding.

Fittings can be more readily attached to Tubing, particularly in sizes 5/16″ and over, if the pipe is screwed onto the Fitting. Always rotate the Tubing in the same direction whether attaching or removing the Fitting.

STYRENE

Styrene (also known as Hi-Impact PolyStyrene) is the most commonly used plastic in molded plastic kits (Model Railroad, Automobile, Airplane and Ship). For that reason, we have chosen Styrene as the medium in our New FineLine Structural model parts for compatibility in kit-bashing. It may be combined with wood, metal and other plastics using special glues or cements. Styrene has a tendency to be brittle, especially after lengthy U.V. exposure or painting. It is easily warped by solvents, so care must be taken when cementing flat sheets for walls, and reinforcement bracing is recommended. When constructing closed tanks or structures, venting is recommended to allow the inside and outside temperatures to equalize. Styrene has excellent forming characteristics and bonds rapidly and permanently. Styrene plastic cuts easily using the “scribe and break” method. Only use Enamel, Alkyd Oil, Latex or Acrylic paints specified for Styrene plastics.

ACRYLIC

Acrylic is the most rigid and brittle of these plastics. Acrylic is processed in three methods; cast, extruded and molded. It is usually warp-free. When used for model making, Acrylic is usually used in tubing and thick sheet form, cubes and balls, and round, square and triangular rod. Acrylic accepts most paints, including lacquer.

COPOLYESTER

Copolyester (also known as P.E.T.G.) is tougher and less prone to split or shatter than Acrylic. It has excellent clarity in sheet form, and is resistant to stress whitening. It is easily formable and not prone to warp. Copolyester is quite stable and bonds well to itself, however with most other plastics, a special industrial grade Cyanoacrylate Glue is recommended. Accepts most paints, including lacquer.

Cement Guide

PLASTIC WELD CEMENT

Instantly tacky. Sets in minutes – bonds permanently overnight. Economical to use. Special formulation dissolves a thin layer of each surface to be joined. It evaporates quickly and forms a welded joint; one as strong as the surrounding plastic. Apply with a small brush or blunted syringe-type applicator. Capillary action will spread it the length and breadth of the joint for a continuous solid weld. Plastic Weld works on most dissimilar Styrene, Butryrate, ABS and Acrylic applications.

BONDENE CEMENT

Bonds instantly. Sets in seconds – bonds permanently in minutes. Economical to use. Special formulation dissolves a thin layer of each surface to be joined. It evaporates quickly and forms a welded joint; one as strong as the surrounding plastic. Apply with a small brush or blunted syringe-type applicator. Capillary action will spread it the length and breadth of the joint for a continuous solid weld. Bondene works on all “alike” Styrene, Butyrate, ABS, Acrylic and Copolyester applications.

For the various materials found in PLASTRUCT’s Catalog, the following cements are recommended:

STYRENE
  • Similar plastics – BOND-2, and PPC-2
  • Dissimilar plastics – PPC-2, EPX and CYC
  • Acrylic sheet, wood & foam – Contact Cement, EPX and CYC
ACRYLIC
  • Similar plastics – BOND-2, PPC-2 and WOC-3
  • Dissimilar plastics – PPC-2 and CYC
  • Acrylic sheet, wood & foam – Contact Cement, EPX and CYC
ABS
  • Similar plastics – BOND-2 and PPC-2
  • Dissimilar plastics – PPC-2 and CYC
  • Acrylic sheet, wood & foam – Contact Cement, EPX and CYC
BUTYRATE
  • Similar plastics – BOND-2, PPC-2 and WOC-3
  • Dissimilar plastics – PPC-2 and CYC
  • Acrylic sheet, wood & foam – Contact Cement and CYC
COPOLYESTER
  • Similar plastics – BOND-2 and PPC-2
  • Dissimilar plastics – CYC-10
  • Acrylic sheet, wood & foam – CYC-10 and Contact Cement
URETHANE FOAM (FOAM)
  • Foam – Hot Glue or Contact Cement
  • All others – Contact Cement
EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE FOAM (FOAM)
  • Foam – Spray Adhesive and White Glue
  • All others – Spray Adhesive, White Glue and Contact Cement
BASSWOOD & BALSAWOOD
  • Wood – Aliphatic Resin
  • Paper – White Glue
  • All others – Contact Cement

Modeling Tips

We are pleased to provide the following collection of creative tips for working with PLASTRUCT Plastic Model Parts.

In our on-going effort to assist the model building world, we welcome your contributions. Please e-mail or mail direct, Attention: Webmaster.

  1. For fast, clean, accurate cutting of Styrene Shapes, Tubing, Strip and Rod, simply scribe with a hobby knife and snap. When cutting Sheet Styrene, make all scribes first and then bend downward one side at a time until it snaps clean.
  2. For professional quality painting of structures, it is recommended that, when possible, construction of the main components be completed and painted assembled. Paint sub-assemblies and other detail parts before attaching to the main structure. Use solvent cement sparingly during final assembly so paint will not run.
  3. ABS hand rails and stair rails may be curved to fit circular applications by softening them in warm water or heating with a hair dryer. Stairs may be modified to fit the circumference of a tank or other curved surface by cutting off the stair stringer from the side to be cemented. Tape the stair in place. Attach each stair step separately.
  4. To avoid gluing your model to your work surface, especially when working with a fast acting solvent cement like Bondene, we recommend you do all cementing on a sheet of polypropylene. Even better, purchase a few serving trays (cafeteria style) and cut the polypropylene sheet to snugly fit inside. This way, the sides will capture any spilled solvent cement before it spoils furniture, and you can use different trays for different in-progress projects.
  5. To create realistic welded (or riveted) tank seams, use a radiator hose clamp as your horizontal guide. Tighten the clamp around the tube, and using a hobby knife, lightly scribe lines every 8 scale feet around the tank. Scribe vertical lines using a straight edge.
  6. For smudge free bonding, apply a small amount of solvent cement with a blunt tipped syringe needle at one end of the parts to be joined and allow the cement to flow, through capillary action, the entire length and breadth of the joint. This will provide a “weld” as strong as the surrounding areas. Be sure to use PLASTRUCT Plastic Weld or Bondene Cements.
  7. All Acrylic Rods may be cut using a fine tooth saw blade. Cut ends should be polished using a flame or WET & DRY fine grit sand paper. Bending may be accomplished by carefully softening the Acrylic using a torch flame or electric stove burner.
  8. Wood structures are the most common found along older and rural railroads. Modeling with wood is easy, and more preferable to plastic among many seasoned railroaders. There is no better way to achieve wood grain than by using wood. However, wood does have its disadvantages. While wood accepts most “white” glues, it takes much longer than plastic for the glued joints to set (usually a minimum of 20 minutes) and dry. Most woods have a “fuzz” that should be lightly sanded unless a rough finish is desired. Wood accepts most paints, but should first be primered. Sanding is suggested after a primer or first coat is applied. Wood can easily be stained and weathered using Minwax. Because stains will quickly be absorbed in wood, care should be taken to not over-soak wood sheets so that they do not warp. Cutting wood can be accomplished with most common hobby tools, including a hobby saw or knife.
  9. To represent building elevations (floors) or glass panels on glass skyscrapers, scribe the front side (reflective side) of Mirrored Sheet with a hobby knife using a straight edge. Trace the grooves with an ink pen or bullet-tipped marker of the appropriate color until the desired effect is achieved.
  10. For best results in landscaping, plant in groups and use different heights of trees to represent varying ages of the trees as well as for creating depth of field. As you move further from the viewing point or higher in the mountains, use shorter trees. Shorter trees may also be used for potted or tubbed trees.

Patterned Sheet

Professional model makers have used plastics as virtually their sole working material for the past 30 years. However, hobbyists, miniaturists and amateur model builders have, for the most part, continued to use wood, card and brass for their models. There are, of course, applications where those materials are suitable or desirable. But in most cases, Plastruct should be your material of choice.

Time, care and skill are needed to get top results. Plastic usually allows easier and faster construction and creates better models. It is recommended to experiment with these techniques on some scrap pieces before committing to a scratch project. These tips are intended to get you on the right track. Your imagination and ingenuity will find many variations on the use and ways to finish Plastruct Plastic Patterned Sheets.

CUTTING & FABRICATING

Basic construction of building shells is usually of a rigid material such as Acrylic, Styrene, Foamboard or plywood. Plastruct Plastic Patterned Sheets can then be applied to create realistic simulated finishes.

These plastic sheets are easily cut with a hobby knife or scissors. For sheet application to a substrate surface, a general purpose spray adhesive or our GES-2 Silicone Adhesive is recommended. In some cases, our Plastruct Plastic Weld or Bondene Cements are preferable, however, caution must be taken to ensure proper application; too much solvent cement may melt the plastic sheet. To remove solvent stains from Styrene sheets, use a Pink Pearl eraser or fine steel wool.

When surfaces larger than a single sheet are to be covered, in most cases, the patterns are designed to allow easy and undetected joining of multiple sheets.

FINISHING & PAINTING

When working with plastics, it is sometimes necessary to fill holes, cracks or joints. For small holes or cracks, any spot putty will work nicely. For larger holes or to create stucco or mortar, we recommend using Spackle or a suitable replacement.

Plastic Patterned Sheet materials representing brick, block, stone, etc. are usually furnished in a color suitable to common applications or effects. To get realistic mortar effects for joints, use a medium to dark concrete gray color flat finish paint of alkyd oil, latex or acrylic base. We recommend Delta or Tamiya (do not use lacquers). Using tissue or a paper towel, wipe the paint into the grooves with a circular motion. With a clean tissue, wipe the excess from the surface while the paint is still wet. If multiple wipings are necessary, take care to not remove paint from the grooves. A slight paint film should be left to soften the shinny surface of the Plastic Patterned Sheet. However, if you want to remove this film it is easily accomplished using steel wool or 220 grit garnet paper.

For variegated brick, paving or stone, the above procedure followed by individual brick or rock application of varied tones of the original color provide realistic results. Further texturing may be achieved by lightly spraying a similar color over the length of the sheet approximately 20 inches above the surface. This spray procedure is also quite effective on roof shingles and on plain surfaces where an aggregate look is desired.

Plastic Patterned Sheets in clear square tile are designed for ceramic tile. It is recommended these be painted on the reverse side to keep the high gloss appearance. If speckling is desired, first spray a light mist approximately 20 inches above the sheet. Or, another way to accomplish this is to dip a toothbrush into the desired speckling paint and then, holding the toothbrush approximately 20 inches above the sheet, run your thumb over the surface of the brush. Note, you should leave most of the surface unpainted. Allow to dry, then apply the main color either with a brush or spray. Fill the tile grooves with “grout” by wiping a suitable colored paint over the top surface of the sheet as described above. Or, you may simply draw in the “grouting” with a permanent waterproof marker.

When applying a wash color over the sheet, a No. 10 or larger camel hair brush is recommended. When painting individual bricks, use a No. 0 square tip brush. Individual stones should be painted with a No. 4 brush.

SPECIAL USES

We have found that many of our Plastic Patterned Sheets can be used for hard-to-find or unusual applications. For your assistance, we provide a few below:

  • The reverse side of our PS-13, 16 and 19 can be used for large wood planking.
  • PS-25, 26 and 27 make excellent road and highway guardrails when cut into strips and mounted on square posts.
  • PSC-40 through 46 make great glass blocks for glass block walls.
  • PS-47 through 59 make excellent industrial vents when modified by adding Styrene Strips to every other slat. They can also be used as window awnings.
  • PS-145 works nicely as frosted glass for bathroom windows or shower stall glass.
  • PS-23 is another excellent method for shower stall glass.

Contoured Topography

We are pleased to provide the following information on creating professional quality multi-level model topography using foam blocks and sheet.

FLAT SITES

A thin sheet of foam (1/4″ Urethane, 3/16″ Foam Board or 1″ Expanded Styrene) adhered to your plywood base makes an excellent working surface for many types of models. Paint the foam with latex or acrylic paint of the proper color. This will provide the perfect surface upon which to apply ground cover and makes tree “planting” an easy task.

CONTOURED SITES

One of the simpler methods when precise contours are unnecessary is the layered method. The following example of this method requires three 1″ sheets of foam the full size of the base. However, in actual practice, you will probably use varying thicknesses.

  1. Establish grade points at 1″ intervals from your contour map (See figures below).Terrain Map
  2. Cut the 0 and 3 contours from your first sheet. Cut contours 1 and 4 from the second, and contours 2, 5 and 6 from the third sheet. Scraps will be used for propping and miscellaneous fill-in. Use a serrated knife or hack saw with a sawing motion when cutting the contours.
  3. Glue the levels of foam together with the appropriate glue (see our cement guide) and hold in position with nails until the glue dries (allow at least 24 hours). Consider nail placement so they will not affect contour shaping later.
  4. With a hobby knife, cut the first contour elevation from your contour map and tack to the appropriate level of foam. With this as your guide, using a serrated knife or hobby knife, roughly trim off the excess foam from that level. Repeat this process until all levels have been trimmed. Remove contour map pieces.
  5. Using coarse sandpaper and caution as foams sand easily, sand the contours smooth.
  6. Paint the foam a color that will be a suitable undercoat for your finished landscape. Use latex or acrylic paint. OR, see our Polyterrain or Magic Earth materials.

Working with our Products

PAINTING

While certain types of paint adhere better than others on various types of plastic, almost any type of paint may be used. Alkyd oils are probably the best all around paints and are available in flat or satin finishes. Use Floquil brushable paints for painting basswood. The pigment in this paint is specially ground to provide good coverage without hiding detail. Latex paints are only suitable when the surface offers some mechanical bond (matte finish). Water colors and poster paints are not recommended. Lacquers are ideal for ABS and Butyrate but are not compatible with Styrene. Minwax stain is excellent for Basswood. Be sure to pre-stain all parts before gluing as the glue seals the wood and prevents the stain from penetrating.

HEAT FORMING

Heat forming, shaping and bending plastics can be done easily in as simple a device as a kitchen oven, provided that the upper heat range can be controlled. The most widely used plastic sheet materials for forming are ABS, Butyrate and Styrene. A new material which also has excellent forming properties is Copolyester plastic sheet. The best temperature to work with these materials is approximately 200° – 25O° F (120° C), and, unless you actually want to melt the material to a near liquid, don’t exceed about 400° F (205° C) under any circumstances.

TOOLS

Possibly the single most useful tool for most model builders is a hobby knife (X-Acto style) with a #11 blade. Add to this a heavy steel rule or straight edge, a triangle or square, hobby saw, an assortment of small files, a mitre box, tweezers or hemostats, a sheet plastic cutting tool, dividers, hand drills, pin vise and bits and you have the contents of a basic toolbox. For most projects, small table top power equipment can be used for a more professional approach and quicker completion. These might include a disc sander, circular saw, drill press, belt sander, a mini drill and bit assortment, and possibly a lathe. Care should be taken when cutting, drilling or machining plastic material to avoid excessive speed or pressure by the tool to the materials, as melting and gumming will result.

PLASTIC WELD CEMENT

Instantly tacky. Sets in minutes – bonds permanently overnight. Economical to use. Special formulation dissolves a thin layer of each surface to be joined. It evaporates quickly and forms a welded joint; one as strong as the surrounding plastic. Apply with a small brush or blunted syringe-type applicator. Capillary action will spread it the length and breadth of the joint for a continuous solid weld. Plastic Weld works on most dissimilar Styrene, Butryrate, ABS and Acrylic applications.

BONDENE CEMENT

Bonds instantly. Sets in seconds – bonds permanently in minutes. Economical to use. Special formulation dissolves a thin layer of each surface to be joined. It evaporates quickly and forms a welded joint; one as strong as the surrounding plastic. Apply with a small brush or blunted syringe-type applicator. Capillary action will spread it the length and breadth of the joint for a continuous solid weld. Bondene works on all “alike” Styrene, Butyrate, ABS, Acrylic and Copolyester applications.

Conversion Tables

Here you will find several tables provided to assist you in determining scale ratios and/or dimensions.

Please note many modelers refer to scale as a fraction, while others refer to it as a ratio. For instance, 1/48 is also referred to as 1:48. Both are correct.

POPULAR MODELING SCALES
HOBBY SCALE HOBBY DESCRIPTION 1 ACTUAL
INCH  =
1 SCALE FOOT =
(FRACTION)
1 SCALE
FOOT =
(DECIMAL)
1 SCALE METER =
(METRIC)
1/4 LIVE STEAM TRAINS
FLYING MODELS
4″ 3″ 3 250.0mm
1/8 LIVE STEAM TRAINS
CARS, MOTORCYCLES
8″ 1-1/2″ 1.50 125.0mm
1/12 DOLLHOUSES
CARS, MOTORCYCLES
1′-0″ 1″ 1 83.3mm
1/16 LIVE STEAM TRAINS
CARS, MOTORCYCLES
1′-4″ 3/4″ .75 62.5mm
1/20 CARS 1′-8″ 19/32″ .60 50.0mm
1/22.5 G SCALE TRAINS 1′-10″ 17/32″ .53 44.4mm
1/24 CARS, DOLLHOUSES, TRUCKS 2′-0″ 1/2″ .50 41.7mm
1/25 CARS, TRUCKS 2′-1″ 15/32″ .48 40.0mm
1/32 NO. 1 TRAINS
AIRCRAFT, CARS, 54mm FIGURES
2′-8″ 3/8″ .375 31.3mm
1/35 ARMOR 2′-11″ 11/32″ .343 28.6mm
1/43 CARS, TRUCKS 3′-7″ 9/32″ .279 23.3mm
1/48 O SCALE TRAINS
AIRCRAFT, ARMOR, 1/4″ SHIPS
4′-0″ 1/4″ .250 20.8mm
1/64 S SCALE TRAINS
AIRCRAFT
5′-4″ 3/16″ .187 15.6mm
1/72 AIRCRAFT, ARMOR BOATS 6′-0″ 11/64″ .167 13.9mm
1/76 ARMOR 6′-4″ 5/32″ .158 13.2mm
1/87 HO SCALE TRAINS
ARMOR, TRUCKS
7′-3″ 9/64″ .138 11.5mm
1/96 AIRCRAFT, 1/8″ SCALE SHIPS 8′-0″ 1/8″ .125 10.4mm
1/100 AIRCRAFT 8′-4″ - .120 10.0mm
1/125 AIRCRAFT 10′-5″ - .096 8.0mm
1/144 AIRCRAFT 12′-0″ 1/12″ .083 6.9mm
1/160 N SCALE TRAINS 13′-4″ - .075 6.3mm
1/192 1/16″ SCALE SHIPS 16′-0″ 1/16″ .062 5.2mm
1/200 AIRCRAFT, SHIPS 16′-8″ - .060 5.0mm
1/220 Z SCALE TRAINS 18′-4″ - .054 4.5mm
1/285 WARGAME PIECES 23′-9″ - .042 3.5mm
1/350 SHIPS 29′-2″ - .034 2.9mm
1/700 SHIPS 58′-4″ - .017 1.43mm
1/720 SHIPS 60′-0″ 1/60″ .016 1.38mm
1/1200 WARGAME SHIPS 100′-0″ 1/100″ .010 0.8mm
1/2400 WARGAME SHIPS 200′-0″ 1/200″ .005 0.4mm
HOBBY SCALE HOBBY DESCRIPTION 1 ACTUAL
INCH  =
1 SCALE FOOT =
(FRACTION)
1 SCALE
FOOT =
(DECIMAL)
1 SCALE METER =
(METRIC)
HOBBY CONVERSION CHART
ACTUAL
SIZE
1″ = 1′-0″
1:12
G
1:24
#1
1:32
O
1:48
S
1:64
HO
1:87
TT
1:120
N
1:160
Z
1:220
2″
5/32″ 5/64″ 1/16″ 3/64″ 1/32″ 1/64″ 1/64″ 1/64″ 1/64″
4″
11/32″ 11/64″ 1/8″ 5/64″ 1/16″ 3/64″ 1/32″ 1/64″ 1/64″
6″
1/2″ 1/4″ 3/16″ 1/8″ 3/32″ 1/16″ 3/64″ 1/32″ 1/64″
8″
21/32″ 21/64″ 1/4″ 11/64″ 1/8″ 3/32″ 1/16″ 3/64″ 1/32″
10″
27/32″ 27/64″ 5/16″ 13/64″ 5/32″ 7/64″ 5/64″ 1/16″ 3/64″
1′
1″ 1/2″ 3/8″ 1/4″ 3/16″ 9/64″ 3/32″ 5/64″ 1/16″
2′
2″ 1″ 3/4″ 1/2″ 3/8″ 9/32″ 13/64″ 5/32″ 7/64″
3′
3″ 1-1/2″ 1-1/8″ 3/4″ 9/16″ 13/32″ 19/64″ 15/64″ 5/32″
4′
4″ 2″ 1-1/2″ 1″ 3/4″ 35/64″ 13/32″ 19/64″ 7/32″
5′
5″ 2-1/2″ 1-7/8″ 1-1/4″ 15/16″ 11/16″ 1/2″ 3/8″ 17/64″
10′
10″ 5″ 3-3/4″ 2-1/2″ 1-7/8″ 1-3/8″ 1″ 3/4″ 35/64″
SCALE EQUIVALENTS
1″ = 100′ 1:1200
1″ = 75′ 1:900
1″ = 60′ 1:700
1″ = 50′ 1:600
1″ = 40′ 1:500
1″ = 30′ 1:400
1″ = 20′ 1:250
1″ = 10′ 1:125
1/32″ = 1′ 1:400
1/16″ = 1′ 1:200
3/32″ = 1′ 1:125
1/8″ = 1′ 1:100
3/16″ = 1′ 1:75
1/4″ = 1′ 1:48
3/8″ = 1′ 1:32
1/2″ = 1′ 1:24
3/4″ = 1′ 1:16
1″ = 1′ 1:12
FRACTIONS TO DECIMALS
FRACTION
DECIMAL
FRACTION
DECIMAL
FRACTION
DECIMAL
FRACTION
DECIMAL
1/64 .0156 17/64 .2656 33/64 .5156 49/64 .7656
1/32 .0312 9/32 .2812 17/32 .5312 25/32 .7812
3/64 .0468 19/64 .2968 35/64 .5468 51/64 .7968
1/16 .0625 5/16 .3125 9/16 .5625 13/16 .8125
5/64 .0781 21/64 .3281 37/64 .5781 53/64 .8281
3/32 .0937 11/32 .3437 19/32 .5937 27/32 .8437
7/64 .1093 23/64 .3593 39/64 .6093 55/64 .8593
1/8 .125 3/8 .375 5/8 .625 7/8 .875
9/64 .1406 25/64 .3906 41/64 .6406 57/64 .8906
5/32 .1562 13/32 .4062 21/32 .6562 29/32 .9062
11/64 .1718 27/64 .4218 43/64 .6718 59/64 .9218
3/16 .1875 7/16 .4375 11/16 .6875 15/16 .9375
13/64 .2031 29/64 .4531 45/64 .7031 61/64 .9531
7/32 .2187 15/32 .4687 23/32 .7187 31/32 .9687
15/64 .2343 31/64 .4843 47/64 .7343 63/64 .9843
1/4 .250 1/2 .500 3/4 .750 1 1.00
FRACTIONS AND DECIMALS TO MILLIMETERS
Inch
mm
Inch
mm
Inch
mm
Inch
mm
Inch
mm
1/64 0.4 17/64 6.7 33/64 13.1 49/64 19.4 1-1/8 28.6
1/32 0.8 9/32 7.1 17/32 13.5 25/32 19.8 1-1/4 31.8
3/64 1.2 19/64 7.5 35/64 13.9 51/64 20.2 1-1/2 38.1
1/16 1.6 5/16 7.9 9/16 14.3 13/16 20.6 1-3/4 44.5
5/64 2.0 21/64 8.3 37/64 14.7 53/64 21.0 2 50.8
3/32 2.4 11/32 8.7 19/32 15.1 27/32 21.4 3 76.2
7/64 2.8 23/64 9.1 39/64 15.5 55/64 21.8 4 101.6
1/8 3.2 3/8 9.5 5/8 15.9 7/8 22.2 5 127
9/64 3.6 25/64 9.9 41/64 16.3 57/64 22.6 6 152.4
5/32 4.0 13/32 10.3 21/32 16.7 29/32 23.0 10 254
11/64 4.4 27/64 10.7 43/64 17.1 59/64 23.4 12 304.8
3/16 4.8 7/16 11.1 11/16 17.5 15/16 23.8 15 381
13/64 5.2 29/64 11.5 45/64 17.9 61/64 24.2 24 609.6
7/32 5.6 15/32 11.9 23/32 18.3 31/32 24.6 30 762
15/64 6.0 31/64 12.3 47/64 18.7 63/64 25.0 36 914
1/4 6.4 1/2 12.7 3/4 19.1 1 25.4    
Inch
mm
Inch
mm
Inch
mm
Inch
mm
Inch
mm
.010 0.3 .110 2.8 .310 7.9 .520 13.2 .920 23.4
.015 0.4 .120 3.0 .320 8.1 .540 13.7 .940 23.9
.020 0.5 .130 3.3 .330 8.4 .560 14.2 .960 24.4
.025 0.6 .140 3.6 .340 8.6 .580 14.7 .980 24.9
.030 0.8 .150 3.8 .350 8.9 .600 15.2 1.00 25.4
.035 0.9 .160 4.1 .360 9.1 .620 15.7 1.25 31.8
.040 1.0 .170 4.3 .370 9.4 .640 16.3 1.50 38.1
.045 1.1 .180 4.6 .380 9.7 .660 16.8 1.75 44.5
.050 1.3 .190 4.8 .390 9.9 .680 17.3 2.00 50.8
.055 1.4 .200 5.1 .400 10.2 .700 17.8 2.25 57.2
.060 1.5 .210 5.3 .410 10.4 .720 18.3 2.50 63.5
.065 1.7 .220 5.6 .420 10.7 .740 18.8 2.75 69.9
.070 1.8 .230 5.8 .430 10.9 .760 19.3 3.00 76.2
.075 1.9 .240 6.1 .440 11.2 .780 19.8 3.50 88.9
.080 2.0 .250 6.4 .450 11.4 .800 20.3 4.00 101.6
.085 2.2 .260 6.6 .460 11.7 .820 20.8 4.50 114.3
.090 2.3 .270 6.9 .470 11.9 .840 21.3 5.00 127
.095 2.4 .280 7.1 .480 12.2 .860 21.8 5.50 139.7
.100 2.5 .290 7.4 .490 12.4 .880 22.4 6.00 152.4
    .300 7.6 .500 12.7 .900 22.9    
Inch
mm
Inch
mm
Inch
mm
Inch
mm
Inch
mm